3rd “ad Gredine” International Chess Festival

Chess takes us to magnificent places, and we can only be grateful for the opportunity. This time, we traveled to a place that looked like it it just came out from a book of fairy-tales. It probably suffices to say that we’re talking about Italy, already known for its rich history and beauty. However, this time we discovered an unknown side (for us) of this magnificent country – the northeast, with its imposing Alps.

We started out Italian chess tour in Ortisei, a town situated in Val Gardena, within the Dolomites. This is a mountain range that is part of the Alps and creates spectacular views. It hosts numerous natural parks and was included in the UNESCO’s World Heritage list in 2009.

Ortisei, with the Dolomites in the background

Ortisei, with the Dolomites in the background

The pedestrian zone in the center of the city

The pedestrian zone in the center of the city

The city center, with a chess themed cafe facing the square

The city center, with a chess themed cafe facing the square

Flowers, flowers everywhere

Flowers, flowers everywhere

As you can probably guess, the area is also a perfect destination for ski and nature lovers. The skiing season was obviously over, but the cable railways were still available for those who like to explore the nature and discover its beauty. We didn’t want to miss any of this, so we tried to be both tourists and chess players – a bit of sightseeing in the morning followed by an intense game in the afternoon.

On our way to the cable train station

On our way to the funicular station

All the way up to the sky

All the way up to the sky

Ortisei seem from 2200 m altitude

Ortisei seen from 2200 m altitude

Couldn't miss the chance to pose with the mighty Dolomites

The high snowy peaks look much closer from high above

Who else would like a house like this?

Who else wants a house like this?

Some great place for meditation

Some great place for meditation

Not far away from Ortisei is Kastelruth (Castelrotto), the biggest village in the Alpe di Siusi holiday area that dates as far back as Roman times.

The historical center of Castelrotto

The historical center of Castelrotto

The Parish Church of Castelrotto, also known as he “cathedral on the mountains”

The imposing Parish Church of Castelrotto, also known as the “cathedral on the mountains”

A sight that takes you back to medieval times

A sight that takes you back to medieval times…

...and tournaments

…and tournaments

View over Castelrotto

View over Castelrotto

And of course some after-game entertainment - watching Romania vs France with my old friend and childhood over-the-board rival Iozefina Paulet

And of course some after-game entertainment – watching Romania vs France with my old friend and childhood over-the-board rival Iozefina Paulet

But let’s get back to the chess aspect of our trip. The festival comprised two tournaments – tournament A for players rated above 1900 and tournament B for those rated under 2000. Overall, about 150 players from 23 countries gathered at start, determined to show good chess and grab some prizes and norms. In tournament A, 14 players out of the 86 were rated above 2400 and 46 were titled. Starting as the top seed was the strong Grandmaster Dieter Nisipeanu, followed by Grandmasters Robert Markus and Tamir Nabaty.

GM Dieter Nisipeanu (2668, GER)

GM Dieter Nisipeanu (2668, GER)

GM Robert Markus (2662, SRB)

GM Robert Markus (2662, SRB)

GM Tamir Nabaty (2610, ISR)

GM Tamir Nabaty (2610, ISR)

GM Jan Werle (2563, NED)

GM Jan Werle (2563, NED)

Post-game analysis between GM Tamir Nabaty (2610) and IM Arthur Pijpers (2471)

Post-game analysis between GM Tamir Nabaty (2610) and IM Arthur Pijpers (2471)

WGM Altan-Ulzii Enkhtuul (2258, MGL)

WGM Altan-Ulzii Enkhtuul (2258, MGL)

Young FM Jonas Bjerre, rated 2410, reflecting on his loss in round 6 to the experienced FM Peter Dittmar of Germany (2258)

Young FM Jonas Bjerre (Denmark), rated 2410, reflecting on his loss in round 6 to the experienced FM Peter Dittmar of Germany (2258)

FM Gabriel Gaehwiler (2363, SUI) scored an IM norm

FM Gabriel Gaehwiler (2363, SUI) scored an IM norm

WFM Dijana Dengler (2044, BIH)

WFM Dijana Dengler (2044, BIH)

Italian IM Marco Codenotti (2451) agrees that chess is not an easy task

Italian IM Marco Codenotti (2451) agrees that chess is not an easy task

Ruben Bernardi is not only a skilled organizer, but also a strong player, rated 2189

Ruben Bernardi is not only a skilled organizer, but also a strong player, rated 2189

The playing hall

The playing hall

A warm welcome to every participant in Ortisei Open

A warm welcome to every participant in Ortisei Open

After nine rounds, first was GM Dieter Nisipeanu, with 7 points. Second, with a last round win over GM Tamir Nabaty, also with 7 points, but worse tie-break was Dutch GM Jan Werle, while third was Italian GM Daniele Vocaturo with 6,5 points.

From left to right: GM Daniele Vocaturo, GM Dieter Nisipeanu, GM Jan Werle and organizer Ruben Bernardi

From left to right: GM Daniele Vocaturo, GM Dieter Nisipeanu, GM Jan Werle and organizer Ruben Bernardi

Needless to say that we had a great time in Ortisei and that we’ll be back here for a next edition of this wonderful tournament. Congratulations to the winners for the good chess they showed and to the organizers for the great coordination of this event!

 

 

This entry was posted in Tournament report and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply